Monday, April 23, 2012

Scandinavian Roots, Gomer & the Ten Lost Tribes of Israel

Sweden and Norway (part of Scandinavia) figure significantly in my autosomal mtDNA results, as did a Scythian ancestral connection.

Uncovering Scandinavian Roots

The term "Scythians" is sometimes applied by historians to a particular people and sometimes to all the nomad tribes in the vast territory north of the Black and Caspian Seas. It is this area where we must find the roots of the Scandinavian peoples. The Cimmerians were the oldest inhabitants of Scythia. Their history can be traced back to near the close of the eighth century Assyrian records. A collection of letters preserved in Ashurbanipal's library inform us of events in the Urartu area of Armenia during the years 707-706B.C. Included in this collection were reports from Assyrian frontier posts. One said the king of Urartu came into "the land of Gamir" and had to be forced back.

For many years E. D. Phillips studied the history of the nomads in Scythia. He says the Cimmerians "appear late in the eighth century on the northern border of the Kingdom of Urartu as the Gimirrai or Gamir of Assyrian records" (page 52, The Royal Hordes, Nomad Peoples of the Steppes). Other historians agree that the Gimirrai were the "Kimmerioi" Cimmerians of the Greeks.

There is also a connection with the biblical Gomer in Hosea's prophecy. Notice that the prophet Hosea married a woman called "Gomer" (Hosea 1:3). She represented the unfaithfulness and slavery of the ten tribes of the House of Israel (chapter 3).

This prophecy indicates that the northern ten tribes of Israel would also be called "Gomer" while in captivity. The Israelites were actually known as Gomerians or Cimmerians.

Read more at the link above.

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